Annuals Perennials2018-06-20T12:01:35+00:00

Flowers: Annuals & Perennials

Johnson’s Gardens grows and stocks hundreds of options of annual and perennial flowering plants throughout the year. Annual plants afford you seasonal customization, while perennials are only installed during the warmer months. Much of our plants are grown locally! Come check us out in Cedarburg, Wisconsin.

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Perennial Flowering Plants

Perennial plants have indefinite life cycles, based on the species.

What is the difference between annual flowers and perennial flowers?

Plants can be classified as either annual, biennial, or perennial. Annual plants complete their lifecycle in one growing season, during which they produce seeds, then die. Common annual plants include impatiens, zinnias, and sunflowers. Biennial plants, such as some types of foxglove, live for two growing seasons before setting seed and dying. The term perennial is reserved for plants that live for more than two years.

Trees and shrubs live for more than two years. Are they perennials?

Technically speaking, trees and shrubs are perennial plants — they grow for more than two years. But we categorize perennial plants into two types: woody plants and herbaceous perennials. Woody plants are trees, shrubs, and vines whose above-ground parts persist over the winter, and resume growth in the spring. Herbaceous perennials are non-woody plants that die back to the ground each fall. The roots, however, survive the winter and the plants re-sprout in the spring.

Why grow perennials instead of, say, a bed of annual petunias, marigolds, or impatiens?

If you grow lots of annual flowers, you are familiar with the annual chores necessary to maintain such beds: you purchase flower seedlings (or start your own), and plant them. You nurture them throughout the growing season, fertilize and water them; then, when the season’s over and the plants die, you pull them out. Next year, the cycle begins anew.

Perennial plants remain in the ground year after year. Once established, many perennials need minimal upkeep in the form of watering and fertilizing, since their roots are more far-ranging than annual plants’ roots. Many perennials spread readily, filling out garden spaces and providing more and more color each year.

johnson's gardens garden center perennials may night salvia

pictured: Salvia nemerosa ‘May Night’

johnson's gardens garden center perennials june hosta

pictured: Hosta ‘June’

Stop in today and see all the flowers we’ve grown for you.

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Frequently Asked Questions

johnson's gardens garden center annuals million bells

pictured: Calibrachoa ‘Million Bells’ — a spring time annual

johnson's gardens garden center annuals chrysanthemum mums fall plants

pictured: An assortment of autumn annuals including Chrysanthemum

Annual Flowering Plants

Annual plants complete their life cycle within one year, and then dies.

What is the difference between annual flowers and perennial flowers?

Plants can be classified as either annual, biennial, or perennial. Annual plants complete their lifecycle in one growing season, during which they produce seeds, then die. Familiar annual plants include impatiens, zinnias, and sunflowers. Biennial plants, such as some types of foxglove, live for two growing seasons before setting seed and dying. The term perennial is reserved for plants that live for more than two years. Many plants treated as annuals in Wisconsin are actually perennials which are not cold hardy enough to survive winter here. Examples include Guara, Geranium, Rosemary, and fall mums.

The cold hard truth about annuals. Are they all the same?

Annual plants can be viewed a few ways: true annuals, winter annuals, and half hardy annuals. True annuals, like African Marigolds which can bloom all growing season if deadheaded, stick around the garden all year before they die. For winter annual gardening, choosing the right annuals and the correct varieties is key to creating a colorful planter, window box, or garden bed at your home. Growing them requires taking into account low light levels, cooler soil temperatures, and the occasional extreme weather of systems of Wisconsin’s polar vortices. Half hardy annuals describe plants that will tolerate some frost, but not a long freeze, such as China asters or zinnias.

Why grow annuals instead of, say, perennial coneflowers, hostas, salvia, or compass plant?

If you have planted lots of perennial flowers, you are familiar with their longevity. You purchase flower seedlings (or start your own), and plant them in a location best fitted to their needs. You’re able to nurture them year after year, fertilize and water them.

Annual plants afford you the seasonal customization of your beds, pots and hanging baskets; They are floriferous, so they will brighten up mixed borders with non-stop color. Another important aspect about annuals is they often germinate quickly and easily, and they set a lot of seed. Once established, many annuals need minimal upkeep in the form of watering and fertilizing; they are very simple to grow. Annual plants allow you to change your mind next season! Perhaps next year you may try a different color scheme.

Select your favorite season to learn more about annual plants for each season.

SPRING
SUMMER
AUTUMN
HOLIDAYS

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Call us today with any questions 262.377.2500

Flowers: Annuals & Perennials

Johnson’s Gardens grows and stocks hundreds of options of annual and perennial flowering plants throughout the year. Annual plants afford you seasonal customization, while perennials are only installed during the warmer months. Much of our plants are grown locally! Come check us out in Cedarburg, Wisconsin.

Stay Connected
Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Perennial Flowering Plants

Perennial plants have indefinite life cycles, based on the species.

What is the difference between annual flowers and perennial flowers?

Plants can be classified as either annual, biennial, or perennial. Annual plants complete their life cycle in one growing season, during which they produce seeds, then die. Common annual plants include impatiens, zinnias, and sunflowers. Biennial plants, such as some types of foxglove, live for two growing seasons before setting seed and dying. The term perennial is reserved for plants that live for more than two years.

johnson's gardens garden center perennials may night salvia

pictured: Salvia nemerosa ‘May Night’

Trees and shrubs live for more than two years. Are they perennials?

Technically speaking, trees and shrubs are perennial plants — they grow for more than two years. But we categorize perennial plants into two types: woody plants and herbaceous perennials. Woody plants are trees, shrubs, and vines whose above-ground parts persist over the winter, and resume growth in the spring. Herbaceous perennials are non-woody plants that die back to the ground each fall. The roots, however, survive the winter and the plants re-sprout in the spring.

johnson's gardens garden center perennials june hosta

pictured: Hosta ‘June’

Why grow perennials instead of, say, a bed of annual petunias, marigolds, or impatiens?

If you grow lots of annual flowers, you are familiar with the annual chores necessary to maintain such beds: you purchase flower seedlings (or start your own), and plant them. You nurture them throughout the growing season, fertilize and water them; then, when the season’s over and the plants die, you pull them out. Next year, the cycle begins anew.

Perennial plants remain in the ground year after year. Once established, many perennials need minimal upkeep in the form of watering and fertilizing, since their roots are more far-ranging than annual plants’ roots. Many perennials spread readily, filling out garden spaces and providing more and more color each year.

johnson's gardens cedarburg garden center events promo

Annual Flowering Plants

Annual plants complete their life cycle within one year, and then dies.

What is the difference between annual flowers and perennial flowers?

Plants can be classified as either annual, biennial, or perennial. Annual plants complete their lifecycle in one growing season, during which they produce seeds, then die. Familiar annual plants include impatiens, zinnias, and sunflowers. Biennial plants, such as some types of foxglove, live for two growing seasons before setting seed and dying. The term perennial is reserved for plants that live for more than two years. Many plants treated as annuals in Wisconsin are actually perennials which are not cold hardy enough to survive winter here. Examples include Guara, Geranium, Rosemary, and fall mums.

johnson's gardens garden center annuals million bells

pictured: Calibrachoa ‘Million Bells’ — a spring time annual

The cold hard truth about annuals. Are they all the same?

Annual plants can be viewed a few ways: true annuals, winter annuals, and half hardy annuals. True annuals, like African Marigolds which can bloom all growing season if deadheaded, stick around the garden all year before they die. For winter annual gardening, choosing the right annuals and the correct varieties is key to creating a colorful planter, window box, or garden bed at your home. Growing them requires taking into account low light levels, cooler soil temperatures, and the occasional extreme weather of systems of Wisconsin’s polar vortices. Half hardy annuals describe plants that will tolerate some frost, but not a long freeze, such as China asters or zinnias.

johnson's gardens garden center annuals chrysanthemum mums fall plants

pictured: An assortment of autumn annuals including Chrysanthemum

Why grow annuals instead of, say, perennial coneflowers, hostas, salvia, or compass plant?

If you have planted lots of perennial flowers, you are familiar with their longevity. You purchase flower seedlings (or start your own), and plant them in a location best fitted to their needs. You’re able to nurture them year after year, fertilize and water them.

Annual plants afford you the seasonal customization of your beds, pots and hanging baskets; They are floriferous, so they will brighten up mixed borders with non-stop color. Another important aspect about annuals is they often germinate quickly and easily, and they set a lot of seed. Once established, many annuals need minimal upkeep in the form of watering and fertilizing; they are very simple to grow. Annual plants allow you to change your mind next season! Perhaps next year you may try a different color scheme.

Select your favorite season to learn more about annual plants for each season.

SPRING
SUMMER
AUTUMN
HOLIDAYS

Call Us Today
262.377.2500

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